February Talk: A Student Summary

The talk’s title is “A New Approach to the Generalizability of Randomized Trials” presented by Dr. Anders Huitfeldt.

To extrapolate causal effects from one setting (the study population of a RCT) to another setting (a clinically relevant target population) we need to justify some parameters. For example, we have to see if the conditional effect parameter in the target population is equal to the corresponding parameter in the study population. Known as the “effect homogeneity”. The effect homogeneity parameter occurs not only between the study population and the target population but also between two groups in the RCT’s population. The principle of extrapolating causal effects is that, because we have a randomized trial in the study population, we know what happens in this population if everyone takes the drug and what if they don’t take the drug. In addition, because the drug is not available in the target population we know what happens if they don’t take the drug. Then, we target to use the above information in combination with homogeneity assumption to predict what happens if someone in the target population don’t take the drug. However, the different definition of “effect homogeneity” leads to a different empirical prediction. Traditional approaches for it are: Effect Measure Modification, Forest plots, Cochran’s Q, I2. These approaches contain some shortcomings which can be reduced (eg. No biological interpretation). That is why a method which can be used to determine choice between effect measures is necessary. The COST parameter would be a new class of causal models for the purpose. The COST parameter has many advantages as effect quality measuring because of (1) a clear biological interpretation, (2) the effect of a drug is determined by gene, (3) Baseline risk independence. Finally, there is still controversial among methodologists about using COST parameter as an approach to determining the appropriate choice of scale if effect homogeneity is considered in terms of measures of effect.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s